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Suggested Publications
Outbreak of Zika virus disease in the Americas and the association with microcephaly, congenital malformations and Guillain–Barré syndrome

This week WAidid suggests the article published on Archives of Disease in Childhood on March 2016 about the outbreak of Zika virus disease and its implications for pediatricians and neonatologists.

SUMMARY:
Prior to 2007, Zika virus (ZIKV) was generally considered an arbovirus of limited importance, causing a mild self-limiting febrile illness. Now, a large, ongoing outbreak of ZIKV that started in Brazil in early 2015 is spreading rapidly across the Americas and has been potentially linked to congenital malformations (including microcephaly) and Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS).
The vast majority of ZIKV infections are asymptomatic (80%) or selflimiting, with most individuals developing a mild self-limiting febrile illness.
Infection with ZIKV in pregnancy is potentially associated with microcephaly and congenital malformations, particularly those of the central nervous system. ZIKV has also been associated with GBS. ZIKV should be considered in the differential diagnosis of. any patient with fever returning from a country where ZIKV outbreaks are ongoing; any neurological and autoimmune syndromes (including GBS) in a patient who has recently travelled to a country where ZIKV outbreaks are ongoing; miscarriage, stillbirth, in-utero death due to infection, congenital infection, microcephaly or any other congenital (especially neurological) abnormality in any infant born to a mother who travelled to a country where ZIKV outbreaks are ongoing.

AUTHORS: Ladhani SN, O'Connor C, Kirkbride H, Brooks T, Morgan D

To read the article online click HERE

Factor H Autoantibodies in Patients with Antiphospholipid Syndrome and Thrombosis

WAidid suggests a study conducted on Serbian and Italian patients. Emerging data indicate that in patients with APS and recurrent venous thrombosis, there are increased levels of FH autoantibodies, a finding associated with poor clinical outcome.

SUMMARY:
Plasma protein factor H (FH) is a main soluble inhibitor of the human complement system. The complement system is a central innate defense system that promotes the inflammatory response and contributes to the destruction of pathogens. Aside from its beneficial effects, the complement system is an aggressive, self-amplifying cascade that needs to be tightly regulated by both soluble and membrane-bound inhibitors to prevent damage of host tissues. Therefore, insufficient functional activity of FH, which can be caused by heritable deficiencies or autoantibodies, is associated with pathology. Autoantibodies to complement factor H (FH) are associated with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, but can also be detected in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and in patients positive for lupus anticoagulants and thus potentially antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). In this study the authors determined FH autoantibody levels using ELISA in 2 cohorts of patients with primary (PAPS) and secondary APS (SAPS) from Serbia and Italy, and an additional cohort including patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) from Sweden. Overall, the data indicate that in patients with APS and recurrent venous thrombosis, there are increased levels of FH autoantibodies, a finding associated with poor clinical outcome.

AUTHORS: Foltyn Zadura A, Memon AA, Stojanovich L, Perricone C, Conti F, Valesini G, Bogdanovic G, Hillarp A, Shoenfeld Y, Sundquist J, Leffler J,Svensson PJ, Trouw LA, Blom AM.

To read the article online click HERE

 

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